Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 53rd World Congress on Nursing and Health Care | Brisbane, Australia.

Day 1 :

World Nursing Congress 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Karen Stansfield photo
Biography:

Dr Karen Stansfield has extensive senior management, strategic leadership and quality assurance experience in the health and care sector, industry and in education. Karen is a highly skilled educationalist and has extensive experience in undertaking curriculum development in both pre and post-registration nursing and specialist education. Karen completed a doctorate in business administration her thesis was on health visiting and leadership. The leadership development model was created from this research. Karen has subsequently been awarded two grants from the The Burdett Trust for Nursing in conjunction with the Institute of Health Visiting in 2017 to pilot and implement the leadership development model and in 2018 to undertake a feasibility study to implement a leadership programme containing the leadership model and to develop and implement a leadership board game based on the leadership model. This was developed and delivered to a wide range of public health nurses in the UK.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The need to strengthen leadership in Public Health Nurses (PHNs) has been voiced in health care policy for the past twenty years (Department of Health, 1999 & 2006; National Health Service England, 2016, 2019). Yet there is still a lack of research examining how PHNs understand leadership, with, much of the existing research on leadership focusing on leaders “per se” as opposed to leadership as a social process.

The purpose of this study is to understand how PHNs perceive their leadership role, and how leadership as a social process is demonstrated in the delivery of the PHN service in the context of the NHS.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: An interpretive perspective using a constructivist grounded theory methodology approach was used to ascertain the participants’ main concerns in relation to leadership (Charmaz, 2014). Using in depth interviews and focus groups.

Findings: A conceptual model of making a difference: how PHNs understand the social processes of leadership has been constructed. The conceptual model demonstrates how the categories, context of leadership, the purpose of leadership and leadership behavior emerged. These were constructed from the comparative analysis, of the data and encapsulate the participants’ main concerns. This model identifies the need to incorporate education based on the three categories and the core category “making a difference” and there is a need to focus on leadership development as a continuous process.

Conclusion & Significance: This study has provided a model for leadership development that can be used as a structural model in PHN in both academic and clinical practice settings, and as a way of articulating how PHNs understand leadership. This study sheds light on the importance of building not only PHN identity but also leadership identity when delivering PHN education.

World Nursing Congress 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Terri Thompson photo
Biography:

Terri Thompson earned her DNP from Western University of Health Sciences in Pomona, CA. Her dissertation was titled: The effective methods for providing preconception health education.

Terri has specialized as a labor and delivery nurse for 21 years at a high-risk tertiary hospital. She has taught in Maternal-Childbearing Nursing Theory and Practicum in higher education for 6 years, and had taught Maternal-Childbearing Clinical Practicum for Loma Linda University, for 15 years.  Terri is the BSN Program Director and Assistant Professor at California Baptist University (CBU), Riverside, CA, U.S.A. Terri is the Faculty Advisor for the Preconception Peer Education club on campus at CBU,  is an advisor for the Office of Minority Health in Maryland, and Counselor for the Chi Mu chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI). Terri has presented extensively on Preconception Health Education across southern California and in Oregon over the past six years.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:  Maternal and newborn mortality continue to increase in the United States, but may be preventable with comprehensive reproductive health education, prior to conception. Preconception health education begins in childhood, teaching health promotion across the life span, including proper diet, exercise, and folic acid supplementation. Education and training needs to be presented, to health science students, to promote healthfulness and promote an increased awareness about the importance of preconception health education. Health care providers should provide preconception health education during routine office visits, however, preconception health education is often not addressed. Among pregnant women, preconception health education decreases the incidence of hypertension and gestational diabetes. Preconception health education decreases the risk of neural tube defects, preterm delivery, and poor health outcomes, in neonates. Gaps exist in curricula, regarding recommendations by governing agencies, about when to address preconception health education. Purpose of the study: To evaluate if preconception health education could improve knowledge and promote changes in lifestyle practices of health science students.

Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: In order to educate health care providers about preconception health education, a study was performed with a face to face presentation to 71 health science  students, at one university in California.   Faculty and student knowledge deficits were addressed and faculty advisors were trained to help students educate peers and members of the community. Pretest-posttest data were collected using a 12-item instrument and analyzed using t-tests.

Findings: Analyses of pretest and posttest data yielded a significant increase in knowledge among participants about preconception health education. Three theories were utilized in this study which included: the Life Course Theory, Theory of Androgogy, and Diffusion of Innovation Theory.   

Recommendations: To introduce curricula regarding preconception health education among students.  The introduction of preconception health education may improve health outcomes for pregnant women and neonates.

World Nursing Congress 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jo Lidster  photo
Biography:

Dr Jo Lidster is the Deputy Head of Nursing and Midwifery, at Sheffield Hallam University. She is responsible for the Department’s post graduate and international portfolio. This includes working closely with stakeholders and practice partners to develop a quality learning experience. Jo leads on learning, teaching and assessment developments for the Department as well as supporting placement learning initiatives. She has had a number of key roles including leading research and innovation and research informed teaching developments as well as course leader roles. Jo is an adult nurse and prior to working in education worked in and managed acute and critical care settings. She teaches on a range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the areas of research methods and evidence based practice, health care education and supporting learners in practice. Jo’s research interests include nurses' professional identity and their transition into new roles.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:

Occasionally a student might work in a way that is professionally undesirable or that constitutes unacceptable professional conduct. When this impacts upon practice assessment and the student is clearly failing, there is usually an established process to help manage this. However sometimes the student might have behaviours we find professionally difficult, yet are still able to progress through their assessments. This sort of behaviour usually accounts for a student who is 'in difficulty'. Both students in difficulty and students who are failing present a complex and challenging situation for those in supervisory roles.

Traditional approaches to mentoring, coaching and supervision position the 'helper' as the expert who identifies what the 'problem' is and any subsequent solutions. The student then receives instruction about what to do, with the underpinning philosophy being that knowledge will lead to a change in behaviour. However, this locates the student in a passive position, does not take into account other factors that influence behaviour and rarely results in change. Models are used in other types of helping relationships to support an individual to a positive outcome. However, the use of these to support students in difficulty has not been well researched.

The study will describe the experience of participants following completion of an educational module which includes the application of a number of helping models. These include: Egan's Skilled Helper; Motivational Interviewing; Cognitive Behavioural Coaching.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: the study is a mixed methods design using quantitative analysis of confidence pre and post module, qualitative analysis of practice reflections and focus group data. Study findings will be reported in May 2019. Conclusion & Significance: The results will help inform future application of helping modules in this context.

World Nursing Congress 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Susan Wakefield photo
Biography:

Susan Wakefield is the Head of Nursing and Midwifery, at Sheffield Hallam University, one of the largest Nursing and Midwifery Departments in England. She is responsible for the educational and practice provision for all for the Under Graduate and Post Graduate nurses and midwives who study within the Faculty.  This includes working closely with the wider University leadership team, stakeholders and practice partners to develop a quality learning experience. During her time in higher education, Susan has worked at Department, Faculty and University level in a number of roles.  She is a mental health nurse and had a range of roles in clinical practice including research nurse, care pathways co-ordinator and community mental health nurse. She teaches research methods and evidence based practice and supervises post graduate students.  

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:

Occasionally a student might work in a way that is professionally undesirable or that constitutes unacceptable professional conduct. When this impacts upon practice assessment and the student is clearly failing, there is usually an established process to help manage this. However sometimes the student might have behaviours we find professionally difficult, yet are still able to progress through their assessments. This sort of behaviour usually accounts for a student who is 'in difficulty'. Both students in difficulty and students who are failing present a complex and challenging situation for those in supervisory roles.

Traditional approaches to mentoring, coaching and supervision position the 'helper' as the expert who identifies what the 'problem' is and any subsequent solutions. The student then receives instruction about what to do, with the underpinning philosophy being that knowledge will lead to a change in behaviour. However, this locates the student in a passive position, does not take into account other factors that influence behaviour and rarely results in change. Models are used in other types of helping relationships to support an individual to a positive outcome. However, the use of these to support students in difficulty has not been well researched.

The study will describe the experience of participants following completion of an educational module which includes the application of a number of helping models. These include: Egan's Skilled Helper; Motivational Interviewing; Cognitive Behavioural Coaching.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: the study is a mixed methods design using quantitative analysis of confidence pre and post module, qualitative analysis of practice reflections and focus group data. Study findings will be reported in May 2019. Conclusion & Significance: The results will help inform future application of helping modules in this context.